Reluctant Dancer

by Bill Bradley
(Darwin Australia)


Here's a small screenprint that I made from a photograph that I took at the Merrepen Arts Festive in the Daly River region of the Northern Territory.

The young guy was, to say the least, not too thrilled about all this dressing up and dancing with the oldies. Just over the back a mob of his mates were having a great time running wild on the footy field.

I did a full size pencil drawing (A4) and then used it as my basis for making my screens.

I love screenprinting or serigraphy as some call it. It has the range and depth of techniques to keep anyone happy. From full on photographic to hand drawing and painting. Once I even used a few twigs and leaves off a tree in my backyard to expose a screen.

Sometimes I painted the block out directly on the screen but mostly I drew on clear acetate first to get more detail.

This particular print was part of an experiment that worked out well. I used a commercial wallpaper paste tinted with standard paint tinters from a builder's supply shop to make my printing inks and cost wise it was ridiculously cheap compared to buying the proper inks, but more interesting was the range of of very subtle tones and transparent overlays that I was able to use later on.

Cheers
Bill

Comments

To dance or not?
by: Jill

That's excellent, Bill. You have caught the mood of the little performer.

I well remember visiting Daly River Mission, decades ago. It was close to the banks of a huge tidal river and we - very stupidly - camped on a sand spit jutting out into it, surrounded by barking crocodiles, their eyes like coals in the light of our torches. Although we kept a fire going all night I think that we were lucky to have not been croc dinner!

Your methods amaze me. I would not have picked your work as a screenprint and hadn't thought of using such materials. I have made a number of prints using artists' acrylic paints, though.

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A Visit To The Tate Modern

by Bill Bradley
(Darwin Australia)


On a recent trip to London I went to the Tate Modern art gallery on the South Bank of the Thames.

My taste in art is more on the traditional side, and I was quite prepared to be disappointed, but really I was very pleasantly surprised. Sure I couldn't understand why anyone would want to build a dining room table and four chairs 12feet high, or leave an upside down wheelbarrow in a corner of a gallery, let alone call it art, but I did find heaps of good stuff.

I had my sketchbook with me and after a while I settled into a room and made a few scratchy pen an ink impressions. I was in a large room with only four paintings and a window. I studied the paintings and couldn't help but notice the visitors and what they looked at.

After a half hour or so I had it worked out, John Mitchell got 5% of the visitors attention, Mark Rothko got 5%, Jackson Pollock a better 10% and Claude Monet held the visitors interest for 15% of their time in that room.

So what did they do for the other 65% of their time? I think you may have guessed it already, yes, you're right, they crowded around the window and looked at Sir Christopher Wren's masterpiece. St Paul's Cathedral and the Millenium footbridge across the river.

Cheers
Bill

Comments

Obvious
by: Ted E. Mueller

Have you ever heard the suggestion, think outside the box?

They were just following their instinct.

They were (actually) looking outside the box.

Observations
by: Jill

Well done, Bill - both your lovely sketch and your observations on visitors' behaviour!

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self portrait

by Anthony Henjel

Tongue in Cheek

Tongue in Cheek

Here is my newest way to do a self portrait in oils. What do you think about it?

perplexed
by: Anonymous

I don't get it. What's the point?

half nude
by: Anonymous

A half nude self portrait. How quaint.

Jill says, 'well, you see, he is painting himself - literally!'

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RAINFOREST GRAAL

by Marie Simberg-Hoglund and Ola Hoglund
( Whyanbeel Valley, Tropical North Queensland )

RAINFOREST GRAAL ONE-OF-A-KIND

RAINFOREST GRAAL ONE-OF-A-KIND

This is a recent addition to our Rainforest Graal Collection. Each individual piece signifies a connection to the landscape, immersing you in a visual impression of the "Forest of Rain" captured in a three-dimensional form. The Graal technique holds the vivid colours and striking decorations at the centre of each piece, suspended in several layers of thick crystal glass. My husband and I work together on each hand-blown piece, which is brought to life by the captivating reflections of light and depths of shade working through the layers.

Comments

Beautiful graal
by: Jill

Marie, what a beautiful piece! Having watched you and Ola at work I know how much physical effort goes into your artwork - and you make it look so easy!

Perhaps one day you might have time to send me an article about the graal technique so that I can post it on the website? I am sure that people would like to learn how it is done.



UP-DATE: Thanks very much, Marie. Done - see https://www.art-in-tropical-australia.com/graal-glass.html

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Pause for Thought

by Roger Hjorleifson
(Adelaide, South Australia, Australia)

Perentie Climbing Tree

Perentie Climbing Tree

This is a life size sculpture of Australia's largest lizard. The goanna(Perentie)is made out of clay and is mounted on a large piece of Red Gum. If you look carefully you just might see a mouse emerging from a hole. The piece is hand painted with acrylics.

Comments

mouse
by: Roger

Yes Jill this lizard is 1.8 metres long. The mouse is rather hard to see. It would be easier if the photo was bigger. I won't give it away yet, hopefully someone can spot it.
huge?

by: Jill

Roger, thanks very much for your sculpture contribution. You've got me on the mouse - I can't see it! Can anyone else? Maybe it is difficult to see as this life-sized Perenti must be at least six feet long? The ones that I have seen have all been at least that length.
Jill

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Riki Riki Naranja

by Antonio Castillo
(Caracas, Venezuela)


Nature is not going to be forever so let's enjoy its beauty while we may.

Comments

marvellous
by: Ted E.

Marvellous use of color and tones. I wanted to reach out and grasp it with my hands.

Awesome display.

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The Complexities of Life

by Kerri Redding
(Atherton)

The Complexities of Life

The Complexities of Life

There are many ways to get ideas for an abstract. This is how this one came to be.

My first decision was the colours to use and I loosely based them on the Bird of Paradise flower and they were chosen for their contrast and appeal. The basic shapes and where they sat I worked out as proportions of the canvas and distributed the colours to represent a building, nature’s greenery, earth, sky, and sun.

I painted all this yet it lacked “something”……I put the painting out in the sun to speed up the drying and the glass pool fence threw a shadow onto the painting, it looked fantastic…..so when the painting was dry I painted the shadows onto it. To “balance” the work I added a few extra shadows and “The Complexities of Life” was born.


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